COVID-19

WVBi COVID-19 Update for June 17, 2020

COVID-19 numbers continue to look good. There were 125 new cases and 18 deaths reported yesterday. That brings the state totals to 60,189 cases and 5,790 deaths. Almost 45-thousand have recovered in the state, leaving just over 15-thousand cases. Running averages continue to look good as well. Seven day moving averages stand at 155 cases 13 deaths.
On the Island, 84 tests have been run. 83 of those are back as negative. None pending. Still only one back as positive. Remember, the Health Center has plenty of test kits. So, if you have any symptoms, a test is easy to get.
In our region, total confirmed case count is stable at 224. Death toll steady at 21 after ticking up by one with a death in Charlevoix County over the weekend—that after being stable since May 12th. No change in county by county data, but they are in today’s script online if you are interested. [Otsego confirmed case count is at 102 with 10 deaths. Emmet is at 21 with two deaths. Grand Traverse is at 35 cases with five deaths. Charlevoix has 17 cases including one from the island, and two deaths. Kalkaska has 19 confirmed cases two deaths. Antrim 12 cases, still no deaths, Leelanau at 12, no deaths. And Benzie is at five cases and no deaths.] Up in the U-P, they are stable at 127 confirmed cases. Death toll is stable, too, at 16.
Rules for dealing with the coronavirus-19 continue to shift. Washington Post yesterday published a story about a study by the American Institute of Physics that says the virus contains clouds that waft into the air when a toilet is flushed. Another study says that the virus lingers in poo even after it is cleared from the lungs. What to do? Close the lid. So fellas, from now on it’s not just seats down, it’s lids down, too. Let the re-training begin.
Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel yesterday proposed a list of reforms she says will make police more accountable. She says that, rather than defunding, is the solution to the problem of instances of police brutality. She would streamline brutality investigations, create a publicly accessible misconduct registry, set up an independent process for investigating civilian deaths involving police and take away retirement benefits from bad officers.